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Craughwell   ~   Oranmore
 
  
Craughwell is a pretty and developing village on the main N6 Galway to Dublin road, within 16 miles of the heart of Galway city. It incorporates the half parish of Ballymana. While agriculture is still the single, largest means of livelihood in the community, Craughwell is becoming a dormitory village for those whose place of employment is Galway city.

It is noted for its neatness and its village green has a statue of Lady Augusta Gregory, a founding member of the Irish National Theatre. The village also celebrates its connection with the Gaelic poet Anthony Raferty (1784 — 1834).

Anthony Rafferty - Mise Raifteirí an File

   
Other noted people associated with Craughwell include John and Angelica Huston of Cinematic fame who lived for a period in the old mansion of St. Clerans nearby, birth place of Robert O' Hara Burke, the first explorer to cross Australia from south to north. Craughwell is also home to the famous Galway 'Blazers' Hunt.

The Dunkellin River, which draws its waters from the Killimordaly bog and the Loughrea lake, provides coarse fishing in its lower reaches. This river widens into the large Rahasane Turlough, which is the home of many species of wild birds, especially waders, which winter there. The land is reasonably flat, with the only relatively high portion on Seefin Hill in the South-East of the parish.

    

 
Anthony Raferty (1784 — 1834)
A native of Kiltimagh, County Mayo, Ó Raifteiri was blinded by smallpox as a child. He lived by playing his fiddle and performing his songs and poems in the mansions of the Anglo-Irish gentry. His work, which draws on the forms and idiom of Irish folk poetry, is widely regarded as marking the end of the literary tradition of the bardic schools. None of his poems were written down during the poet's lifetime, but they were collected from those he taught them to by Douglas Hyde, Lady Gregory and others, who later published them.

Ó Raifteiri's most enduring poems include Eanach Dhuin, Cill Aodain which are still learned by Irish schoolchildren. Although many people think it is he who wrote ' "Mise Raifteirí an File" it was in fact written in America toward the end of the 19th C by Seán O Ceallaigh. The first four lines of Mise Raifteiri an File appeared on the reverse of the Series C Irish five pound note.
 
 

 

 
Towns & Localities in County Galway

 Aran Islands | Athenry | Ballinasloe | Ballygar | Barna | Carna | Carraroe | Claregalway | Clarinbridge | Clifden | Clonbur | Corofin
Connemara | Corrandulla | Dunmore | Galway City | Glenamaddy | Gort | Headford | Kinvara | Leenane | Loughrea | Milltown | Monivea
 Mountbellew | Moycullen | Oranmore | Oughterard | Portumna | Renvyle | Salthill | Spiddal | Tuam | Turloughmore | Williamstown
 

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